Potloc Insights

Discover the Potloc Blog: Conducting consumer research through social networks, Potloc is a faster, more accurate way to conduct market research.

Online Panels: Benefits and Limitations

4 minutes read

In the last fifteen years, web panels have been described as an efficient method in market surveys. You might have guessed that the massive adoption of the internet and computing applications among the general public is behind that trend.

Read More

7 Myths About Social Media Surveys Debunked

12 minutes read

Social media surveys are the newest addition to consumer research methodologies. While social networks have been around for a while now, research methodologies have remained somewhat within the traditional spectrum of online panels, phone and intercept interviews. 

Read More

Stats to Make the Most out of your Consumer Research on Social Media

22 minutes read

Social media networks have been around for a while. Back in 1997, Six Degrees was all the rage until Facebook took the crown in 2004. In the following years, many entrepreneurs attempted to become the “new Zuckerberg”, stepping into this virtual world with platforms like Instagram, Snapchat or Whatsapp.

Read More

Insights from the Canadian front lines of the COVID-19 pandemic

4 minutes read

At Potloc, we wanted to give a voice to the brave health workers who are in the front lines of the COVID-19 crisis in Canada. We conducted a study in partnership with the Canadian Public Health Association.

 

 

Read More

Interview: Data Quality in the age of consumer panels

12 minutes read

Marc Di Gaspero started his journey at Potloc 2 years ago. With more than 10 years of experience in market and consumer research, he is at the helm of our research team that delivers hundreds of studies to businesses in categories as diverse as retail, real estate, CPG, and municipalities.

Read More

5 reasons why turning consumer research into a new communication channel is a great idea.

4 minutes read

Traditionally, consumer research has been about asking questions to consumers to understand their behaviors. No matter what method is being used, once the survey is over, the communication usually ends. If you think about it, in a way, this approach is “using” the consumer to extract his opinions, and then treating them almost like a date you’ll never call back.

Read More